Depression Tied to Worse Outcomes for Black Patients With Heart Failure

Title: Depression Tied to Worse Outcomes for Black Patients With Heart Failure
Category: Health News
Created: 4/22/2015 12:00:00 AM
Last Editorial Review: 4/23/2015 12:00:00 AM

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Gene May Play Part in How Kids Respond to Asthma Meds: Study

Title: Gene May Play Part in How Kids Respond to Asthma Meds: Study
Category: Health News
Created: 4/22/2015 12:00:00 AM
Last Editorial Review: 4/23/2015 12:00:00 AM

Read full article on medicinenet.com


Bird Flu Poses Little Threat to People: CDC

Genetic analysis indicates public shouldn't be alarmed, 'cautiously optimistic' health officials say

Read full article on webmd.com


Antibiotic Shortages On the Rise in U.S.

Commonly used medicines are essential, but not profitable for companies, expert says

Read full article on webmd.com


Middle age 'starts at 60' claims media

“Middle age begins at 60, say researchers,” The Times reports. A new population modelling study estimates that due to increased lifespan, what was once regarded as elderly should be seen as middle-aged, and this trend will continue into the future.

Traditionally, medical professionals, particularly epidemiologists, regarded 65 as the age at which somebody becomes elderly. This was based on the expectation that they probably only had a few years left to live.

As this study argues, however, this expectation is no longer valid.

Improvements in life expectancy and health mean that categorising someone as old because they've turned 65 no longer makes sense.

Instead, they suggest looking at how long a person may have left to live, based on average life expectancy, which in the UK is currently around 79 years for men and 82 for women (this is expected to rise in the future).

This means that people in their late 60s with a life expectancy of 10 to 15 years would not count as old, and the proportion of the population considered old would be smaller.

While healthy living may contribute to longer lifespans, the study doesn't suggest that we hit middle age later. Using the new...


Read full article on nhs.uk/News/Pages/NewsIndex.aspx


Does happiness have a smell and is it contagious?

"Humans can smell when other people are happy, researchers discover," The Independent reports; somewhat over-enthusiastically.

In a new study, Dutch researchers investigated where happiness could be "spread" to others, via body odours, through a process known as "chemosignalling".

Nine men provided sweat specimens during three sessions that aimed to make them feel happy, fearful or neutral. Film and TV clips were used to induce these feelings.

Thirty-five female students were then asked to smell the samples and their reactions were captured.

The women were more likely to have a happy facial muscle response if the sample was taken while the men watched happy clips. A fearful response was more likely if the sample was taken in the fear condition. Women seemed to be able to tell if the sweat had come from men in the happy or fearful condition compared to the neutral condition, but not from each other.

It is not possible from such a small study to be able to say with certainty that any changes were due to the smell.

The hypothesis that emotions could be spread via odours may be plausible to anyone who has been in a sweaty mosh-pit, rave, or the middle-aged equivalent, a...


Read full article on nhs.uk/News/Pages/NewsIndex.aspx


Discovery could 'boost immune system's cancer fighting ability'

The media is awash with news of a breakthrough that is "turbocharging the immune system to kill all cancers" (The Daily Telegraph) and a "game-changing new way to fight cancer" (The Independent).

Both of these vivid headlines are debatable – the first because the technique has only been looked at in one type of cancer, and the second because it has only been examined in lab mice.

Researchers were actually looking at a way to overcome "exhaustion" of the body's immune system when its killer cells (called CD8 T cells) have too much to deal with. They wanted to find out how to increase the number of these killer cells, and memory cells that help the immune system "remember" cancers and viruses.

The researchers used genetic techniques in mice to study CD8 T cells. They discovered a protein, lymphocyte expansion molecule (LEM), which helps increase the number of CD8 T cells, improving the mice's ability to fight viruses or cancer cells. The LEM protein is a new discovery, and the researchers hope they can produce treatments for human diseases based on it.

Discovery aside, research on this protein is at its first stage. A balance of the beneficial and harmful effects of boosting the...


Read full article on nhs.uk/News/Pages/NewsIndex.aspx


Study doesn't prove e-cigs make quitting smoking harder

"E-cigs don’t help smokers quit fags – in fact they make it harder to stop," the Daily Mirror reports, apparently turning on its head the common view that using e-cigarettes can help you quit smoking conventional cigarettes.

The Mirror’s report – echoed in the Daily Mail – was based on surveys of American smokers’ habits and intentions to quit. The study found that people who had ever used e-cigarettes were about half as likely to have reduced their smoking or quit one year later compared to those who said they would never use them.

This might look like a significant finding considering the controversy over whether e-cigarettes are a useful aid to quitting. But we don’t know whether the people who used e-cigarettes were actually using them to try and quit, or whether they actually used them between the first and second surveys. There may be many factors including lifestyle and use of other smoking cessation therapies, which were not considered by the researchers.

Ideally, a well-conducted randomised controlled trial would be needed to examine the effect of e-cigarette use on the success of people wanting to quit, comparing success rates between e-cigarette users and those...


Read full article on nhs.uk/News/Pages/NewsIndex.aspx


There are six different types of obesity, study argues

"Researchers have identified six 'types' of obese person," The Independent reports. It's argued that each type would benefit from a targeted treatment programme for obesity, rather than a "one-size-fits-all" approach.

This study looked at data from more than 4,000 obese adults taking part in the Yorkshire Health Study. It aimed to see whether it was possible to categorise obese individuals according to common health and lifestyle characteristics.

The study reported six clusters of obese individuals. These were:

  • young healthy females – women who were obese, but generally had fewer obesity-related complications, such as type 2 diabetes
  • heavy-drinking males – as above, but with higher alcohol intake
  • unhappy and anxious middle-aged – predominantly women with poor mental health and wellbeing
  • affluent and healthy elderly – generally positive health, but defining characteristics of higher alcohol intake and high blood pressure
  • physically sick but happy elderly – older people with more chronic diseases such as osteoarthritis, but good mental health
  • poorest health – people who were the most economically deprived and had the greatest number of chronic diseases...

Read full article on nhs.uk/News/Pages/NewsIndex.aspx


Why you should drink (water) before you drive

"Not drinking enough water has same effect as drink driving," The Daily Telegraph reports. A small study found participants made more mistakes on a driving simulator task when they were mildly dehydrated than when they had plenty of fluids.

This was a small trial of 12 men, studying the effect of mild dehydration on performance during a driving task. The men had a day of being hydrated or fluid-restricted prior to spending two hours in a driving simulator showing a view of a monotonous dual carriageway.

This was a crossover trial, meaning that all men acted as their own control, undertaking both hydrated and dehydrated conditions one week apart.

The researchers found men in the dehydrated state made around double the number of driving errors during the two-hour drive compared with the hydrated group.

Overall, the detrimental effects of dehydration on wellbeing and physical and mental performance are well-publicised, so the results are entirely plausible. But the study has many limitations, so it cannot provide solid proof.

These include the very small sample size and the fact that spending two hours in a driving simulator in an enforced state of dehydration or hydration may...


Read full article on nhs.uk/News/Pages/NewsIndex.aspx


Mistreatment of extreme morning sickness 'leading to abortions'

"Extreme morning sickness causes 1k abortions a year, study finds," The Daily Telegraph reports. The report states that poor treatment of some cases of extreme morning sickness (hyperemesis gravidarum) is leading some women to terminate their pregnancy, despite there being safe and effective treatments available.

While morning sickness can be unpleasant, hyperemesis gravidarum (HG) can be extremely debilitating. It can cause feelings of constant nausea, frequent vomiting (some women have reported vomiting up to 50 times a day) and dehydration. Left untreated, it can even be life-threatening.

The "one thousand" figure quoted by the Telegraph comes from an unpublished survey reportedly finding that up to 10% of women with severe morning sickness terminate a pregnancy because of this. We are therefore not able to comment further on the representation of this survey or the validity of this figure.

 

What is the basis for these reports?

In a joint report called "I could not survive another day", The British Pregnancy Advisory Service and Pregnancy Sickness Support recount women's experiences of severe pregnancy sickness.

The report aims to improve treatment and tackle stigma for...


Read full article on nhs.uk/News/Pages/NewsIndex.aspx


Mindfulness 'as good as drugs for preventing depression relapse'

"Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy may be as good as pills at stopping people relapsing after recovering from major bouts of depression," The Guardian reports.

Researchers wanted to see if a type of therapy known as mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) could be an effective alternative treatment to antidepressants for people with major depression at high risk of relapse.

MBCT combines the problem-solving approach of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) with mindfulness techniques. These are designed to fix your awareness on the "here and now" instead of having unhelpful thoughts about the past and the future.

In a two-year clinical trial, people already taking antidepressants were assigned to a MBCT programme with a view to reducing or stopping their medication, or were asked to continue antidepressants alone. With support from their GP and therapist, around 70% of the mindfulness group were able to stop taking antidepressants.

The trial suggests MBCT might help some people with major recurrent depression reduce or cut out their medication. However, between four and five people out of every 10 in the trial relapsed within two years, regardless of their treatment....


Read full article on nhs.uk/News/Pages/NewsIndex.aspx


Coffee could make breast cancer drug tamoxifen more effective

"A cancer-killing cocktail of the hormone drug tamoxifen and two coffees every day was found to reduce the risk of [breast cancer] tumours returning," the Mail Online reports. The same study also found evidence that caffeine slowed the cancer's growth.

The study looked at coffee consumption among 1,090 women with breast cancer, about half of whom were treated with tamoxifen.

Tamoxifen is a hormonal treatment used to treat cases of breast cancer known to be associated with the hormone oestrogen (known as oestrogen-dependent breast cancer).

The study found that women who reported drinking two to five cups of coffee a day had smaller primary tumours and a lower proportion of oestrogen-dependent tumours than those who drank one cup of coffee or less.

Women with oestrogen-dependent breast cancer who were treated with tamoxifen, and who drank at least two to five cups of coffee daily, had half the risk of the cancer recurring as those who drank less.

Researchers also carried out a laboratory study on the effect of two substances found in coffee – caffeine and caffeic acid (a compound found in coffee) – on breast cancer cells. They found that the substances suppressed the growth of...


Read full article on nhs.uk/News/Pages/NewsIndex.aspx


Athlete’s foot cream could also treat multiple sclerosis

"Two common drugs – one used for treating athlete's foot and another for alleviating eczema – may be useful therapies for multiple sclerosis," BBC News reports. The drugs have shown promise in lab and animal studies.

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurological condition caused by damage to myelin. Myelin is a protein that acts as a protective layer to individual nerve fibres.

In this study researchers screened a number of drugs used for other conditions in the lab to see if any could produce mature cells to help replace damaged myelin.

One of the chemicals they identified as promising in their screen was miconazole, which is the active ingredient in some types of antifungal creams used to treat athlete’s foot. They found that it increased the number of mature myelin-producing cells in the brains of baby mice. It also helped repair damaged myelin in a mouse model of MS, and this made the mice’s symptoms less severe.

Clobetasol, a steroid cream used to treat psoriasis and eczema, also showed promise.

This is an early-stage study, and researchers hope they can eventually go on to test the drugs, or similar chemicals, in people with MS. Researchers will need to establish how safe...


Read full article on nhs.uk/News/Pages/NewsIndex.aspx


Kids, Allergies And A Possible Downside To Squeaky Clean Dishes

February 25, 2015 - The study showed that those whose parents said they mostly wash the family's dishes by hand were significantly less likely to develop eczema, and somewhat less likely to develop allergic asthma and hay fever.

Read full article on nationaleczema.org


Secondhand Smoke Exposure in Womb Linked to Eczema in Childhood

March 4, 2015 - Children born to mothers who were exposed to secondhand tobacco smoke during pregnancy face an elevated risk of eczema and other skin problems in childhood.

Read full article on nationaleczema.org


People with Eczema are Itching for Better Health Care

March 5, 2015 - Check out this NPR piece on an important new study about how eczema affects the lives of people who have it by NEA Scientific Advisory Committee member Jonathan Silverberg, MD. Data from this study demonstrates the burden of living with eczema, which helps further the case for more eczema research.

Read full article on nationaleczema.org


Triumph at the FDA

March 10, 2015 - On March 9, 2015, NEA CEO Julie Block, 13-year old eczema patient Isaiah, 17-year old eczema patient Gracie, and their parents were present at an important Food and Drug Administrative (FDA) hearing regarding the unmet medical need for atopic dermatitis therapies in pediatrics.

Read full article on nationaleczema.org


Alternative Treatments

March 10, 2015 - There seem to be three major reasons why patients seek alternative medicine for atopic dermatitis: First, we simply don’t yet have a cure for this disease. Second, we can’t yet clearly explain why this disease occurs. While doctors try hard to describe factors that play a role in atopic dermatitis, such as cytokines and inflammatory cells, we still can’t pinpoint the root of the disease. Third, the outcomes of conventional atopic dermatitis treatments are not always consistent, and sometimes they are perceived as being unsafe.

Read full article on nationaleczema.org


Education Announcement: use of topical corticosteroids for eczema

NEA formed a Scientific Advisory Committee Task Force to conduct a systematic review of topical corticosteroid withdrawal/topical steroid addiction in patients with atopic dermatitis and other dermatoses, and created a NEA education announcement on Topical Steroid Addiction/Withdrawal.

Read full article on nationaleczema.org


SAGES Quality Summit Meeting

SAGES Quality Summit Meeting May 15 – 16, 2015, 2015 Grand Hyatt, Washington DC Meeting Goals: 1. Determine the challenges and potential solutions for the development and implementation of quality initiatives in health care, 2. Define the role of surgical & endoscopic societies as facilitators in this process, 3. Inspire society-driven patient-centered quality efforts, 4. […]

The post SAGES Quality Summit Meeting appeared first on SAGES.


Read full article on sages.org


Springtime Allergy Season Is Underway – Tips on How to Cope

SpringAllergiesBlog.png Ah, spring – the return of crocuses, baseball, and, for some, itchy, watery eyes, congestion and other allergy symptoms. For some people, symptoms may be mild. For others, it may be severe enough to limit activities, interfere with sleep, or...



Read full article on kidswithfoodallergies.org


Nutrition and the Child With Food Allergies: A Family Affair (Video and Resources)

Kids With Food Allergies (KFA), a division of the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, hosted a free educational webinar on March 31, 2015, featuring Debra Indorato, RDN, from our Medical Advisory Team.   Deb discussed “Nutrition and...



Read full article on kidswithfoodallergies.org


Egg Allergy Alert - La Guadalupana Wholesale Co., Inc. Recalls Pork and Chicken Tamales

La Guadalupana Wholesale Co., Inc. Recalls Pork and Chicken Products Due To Misbranding and an Undeclared Allergen Class I Recall  057-2015 Health Risk: High  Apr 8, 2015   Congressional and Public Affairs Whitney Joy  (202)...



Read full article on kidswithfoodallergies.org


Soy Alert - Corn Maiden Foods, Inc. Recalls Beef and Pork Products Due To Misbranding and an Undeclared Allergen

059-2015-brisket-taquitos.jpg Corn Maiden Foods, Inc. Recalls Beef and Pork Products Due To Misbranding and an Undeclared Allergen Class II Recall 059-2015 Health Risk: Low Apr 11, 2015 Congressional and Public Affairs Whitney Joy  (202) 720-9113 WASHINGTON, April 11, 2015 ...



Read full article on kidswithfoodallergies.org


The Egg-Free Vegan Meringue Recipe That Will Shock You

vegan-egg-free-meringue.png Kids With Food Allergies introduces 2nd Generation Allergy Mom, AKA Eileen Rhoadarmer, who writes about her own and her children’s food allergies from her home in Colorado. Eileen’s blog about vegan meringue recently lit up our Food and...



Read full article on kidswithfoodallergies.org


Glass Mosaic Created for KFA, AAFA to Be Unveiled at May 30 Celebration

studentworkingKFAmural.png When Kids With Food Allergies (KFA) became part of the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA) two years ago, its leadership knew that someday they would want something unique created to signify the uplifting spirit and philosophy of KFA...



Read full article on kidswithfoodallergies.org


Milk Allergy Study Shows People with Asthma Should Be Included in Food Allergy Research

milkresearch content image.jpg A recent study showed some success in treating milk-allergic asthmatics with oral immunotherapy.   The authors suggested that future studies include people with asthma. That's because people with food allergies and asthma have a higher risk for...



Read full article on kidswithfoodallergies.org


15 Easy Ways to Make a Difference and Raise Food Allergy Awareness

food-allergy-awareness-ribbon.png May 10-16 is Food Allergy Awareness Week! While we know that the realities of living with food allergies are 24/7 year-round, this time of year always presents a special opportunity to educate others. So here are some ideas to join Kids With Food...



Read full article on kidswithfoodallergies.org


Jumpy's Story

Jumpy had the most perfect, soft, peach-like skin as a baby. From the day I started introducing solids, the cradle cap she had had for months miraculously disappeared and the eczema took its place. My very content, good little sleeper became insomniac and the constant itching made her increasingly irritable. On good days, she would have red patches on her face and body. On bad days, she would scratch herself to bleeding point and her clothes would stick to her skin.  At first, we just assumed she had a rash, and I tried everything I could get over the counter to make her feel better. It is just awful when months down the line, despite the fact you are doing everything you have been advised to; you see no improvement and your baby scratches until she bleeds.

When the bad skin (we did not know what it was for the first few months) got quite bad, I started writing down everything she was eating and I was also keeping a photo diary of her skin. It did not look good, and I became a tad obsessive with the pictures, taking several each day and comparing them to see at what time of that day it had got worse or seemed to calm down. You try to stop yourself, but all you can think is...


Read full article on allergyuk.org


New Legislation Eases Food Allergies Fears

The new EU FIC Food Information for Consumers Regulation comes into force on 13th December 2014. The legislation is a way of standardising the advice given on allergens present in food. 

Food allergy and intolerance not only has a physical impact on the sufferer’s life but also a psychological one.  Allergy UK believes that everyone should be able to enjoy eating out without having to think about the consequences.

Lindsey McManus, Deputy CEO, Allergy UK says: “For those with allergies and intolerances, trying to find a restaurant, take away or café that can cater for them, and understands the implications of providing a meal that is safe for them or their child to eat, can prove incredibly challenging. Many people with a food allergy or intolerance simply choose to eat at home where they can be sure that they are not going to have an allergic reaction, and that they won’t end up in A&E.”

Until now, there was no standardised way of showing an allergy warnings on pre-packed food, meaning there were huge variations between manufacturers. Most worryingly, displaying allergy information was voluntary.

From this month, the top 14 food allergens in pre-packed food products will have...


Read full article on allergyuk.org


New allergy qualification from RSPH

The Royal Society for Public Health (RSPH) has developed a new catering qualification entitled Identifying and Controlling Food Allergy Risks. The Level 2 Award was developed in conjunction with Allergy UK ahead of the recent EU Food Regulations.

Full press release follows:

With new changes to food labelling law coming in to place on 13th December 2014, the Royal Society for Public Health (RSPH) have developed a qualification designed to ensure those involved in the production, preparation and serving of food can uphold higher standards in identifying and controlling food allergy risks.

The Level 2 Award in Identifying and Controlling Food Allergy Risks will emphasise the vital importance of communication with customers as a means to improve customer experience, avoid litigation and most importantly to safeguard the wellbeing of the public.

On 13th December 2014, the new EU Regulation on the Provision of Food Information to Consumers (1169/2011 EC) comes into effect bringing new legislation for food businesses to provide allergy information on food sold unpackaged, in for example catering outlets, deli counters, bakeries and sandwich bars. Businesses will face increasing...


Read full article on allergyuk.org


Top Valentine's Day allergy tips

Valentine’s Day is renowned for romantic gestures and fun first dates but for some it can be a lot more worrying than just experiencing a few nervous butterflies.

If you suffer from a food allergy or intolerance, a first dinner date can be a bit daunting. You may feel slightly apprehensive about discussing your health issues in public in front of a new love interest but don’t be embarrassed. Make sure you alert your waiter of any dietary needs and if you are really concerned then try visiting or calling the restaurant before the big date.

Under the new food allergy labelling regulations, all catering outlets must be able to provide allergen information on request. The restaurant should be able to advise you on a suitable meal before you even arrive which will put your mind at rest before the date itself. At the end of the day, you want to feel comfortable on your date and you don’t want to waste time worrying about allergic reactions.

If eating out on your first date is just a little bit too nerve-wracking, try a different activity. There are so many fun things to do these days, instead of a romantic meal why not do something active like bowling? You can visit the cinema or...


Read full article on allergyuk.org


Eating peanut at an early age prevents peanut allergy in high-risk infants

The results of the LEAP (Learning Early About Peanut Allergy) study led by Professor Gideon Lack, King's College London, have been revealed. The study has shown that peanut consumption in infancy can help prevent peanut allergy. Commenting on the findings, Maureen Jenkins, Clinical Director, Allergy UK said:

 “There has been an increasing body of opinion amongst researchers that exposing babies and infants to peanut protein can protect them from allergic reactions to peanuts. This excellent clinical evidence from the LEAP study has demonstrated that babies with eczema and/or egg allergy, who are more likely to develop peanut allergy, are less likely to do so when they are given small amounts of peanut protein from early life. This latest research will prove hugely beneficial to parents of babies with a tendency to allergies.”

 

Full press release follows:

Eating peanut at an early age prevents peanut allergy in high-risk infants

King's College London

New evidence shows that the majority of infants at high-risk of developing peanut allergy are protected from peanut allergy at age 5 years if they eat peanut frequently, starting within the first 11 months of life. For many years...


Read full article on allergyuk.org


Allergy Alert Update: Santa Maria

Allergy UK has received the following statement from Santa Maria following the recent recall of products. For further information please contact Santa Maria, details follow:

Message of reassurance to Allergy UK supporters

Following reports on traces of almond protein found in a batch of paprika, Santa Maria would like to reassure Allergy UK supporters that the health of our customers is our priority. We take the security of our food chain and the transparency of ingredients extremely seriously.

On 16 February, we recalled a number of products (full list below) from the market on a precautionary basis. We found traces of almond protein in the paprika that was not declared in the ingredients, which makes the product a possible health risk to nut allergy sufferers.

Consumers should return any of the products listed to the store where they were purchased for a full refund.

Neither Santa Maria nor the supplier of the paprika powder used in our products handles almonds or nuts in their production facilities. We are taking this incident seriously and have initiated a full investigation of the supply chain in order to find out why this has happened and to prevent it from happening...


Read full article on allergyuk.org


Top chefs comment on food labelling regulations: Allergy UK's response

Severe food allergy is a potentially life-threatening condition. Those with a food allergy know only too well the risks posed when eating out and as a result, frequently choose not to. 

With over 20,000 people being admitted to hospital each year with allergy[1], Allergy UK was pleased to see EU legislations put in place last year to improve the quality of life for allergy sufferers in the UK.

There have been some complaints in the press today from chefs and restaurateurs regarding the food regulations. While we fully understand the impact the new laws will have on the catering industry, we would urge restaurants to consider how allergy affects people’s lives and why these regulations have been implemented in the first place.

The legislation has been on the horizon for around two years. It did not come as a surprise to the catering industry when it was officially rolled out in December 2014.

It is also important to highlight that these changes to do not mean that restaurants must cater for those with allergies, all that is being asked is that catering outlets are transparent with ingredients and know what allergens are in recipes.

The new regulations are there to help allergy...


Read full article on allergyuk.org


New restaurant directory Can I Eat There? launches today for people with food allergies

We're proud to be partnering with Can I Eat There, a brilliant new resource for the allergic community. Read more about their fantastic new website below...

Can I Eat There? is a brand new restaurant directory for people with food allergies. For the first time, you can search for a restaurant by location, postcode or restaurant name, and filter your search by the 14 EU allergens to only see restaurants that cater for your allergy, as well as by cuisine and rating.

You can then view restaurants in your area together with a user-friendly allergy menu and the restaurant’s allergy policy, to help you make a decision about where is best to eat, and the choice of food available to you when you get there.

Nicky Granger, founder of Can I Eat There? and mother of a child with nine severe allergies says, “Eating out should be one of life’s great pleasures, yet so many people with food allergies find it easier to stay home because of how difficult it is to find accessible allergy-menu information, or speak to an informed person at the restaurant itself. Struggling to find places where we could eat with Gabriel is what led me to start Can I Eat There?”

The website launched today with...


Read full article on allergyuk.org


Allergy Awareness Week: Living In Fear - The Story

BRITAIN FACING “HIDDEN” ALLERGY EPIDEMIC

Millions living in fear of fatal allergic reactions 

New research[i] from Allergy UK shows terrifying lack of life-saving awareness Over two thirds (68%) of UK adults have no idea what to do if they saw someone suffering an allergic reaction Almost half (44%)[ii] of allergy sufferers are living in daily fear of a reaction Yet 66% of people don’t how to use an adrenaline pen which could help save lives 

BRITAIN is in the grip of a major allergy crisis, with millions of sufferers at risk of dying because of a terrifying lack of life-saving awareness among the public. 

Allergy UK has found that nearly half of the nation’s severe allergy sufferers live in daily fear of suffering what could be a deadly allergic reaction, also known as anaphylaxis. 

Yet new research carried out by the national charity has found that the majority of the UK population (68%) would not know how to help if they saw someone suffering from a reaction. 

The research comes as the latest NHS statistics[iii] reveal hospital admissions in England for allergic reactions are soaring to more than 20,000 each year, over 60% (12,560) of these are emergencies. 

But the...


Read full article on allergyuk.org


Study findings challenge current thinking on BPA toxicology

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers say that while a large majority of newborns are exposed in their earliest days to bisphenol A (BPA), a much-studied chemical used in plastics and in food and soda can linings, they can chemically alter and rid their bodies of it.

Read full article on news-medical.net


Calorie restriction can improve muscle metabolism during middle age

Calorie restriction has long been studied as a way to extend lifespan in animals. It has been associated with the ability to reduce the risks of cardiovascular and other diseases and to improve overall health.

Read full article on news-medical.net


WHO calls on global health community to address significant gaps in prevention, treatment of malaria

WHO is calling on the global health community to urgently address significant gaps in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of malaria. Despite dramatic declines in malaria cases and deaths since 2000, more than half a million lives are still lost to this preventable disease each year.

Read full article on news-medical.net


Cerner expands use of Jive's enterprise collaboration solutions to improve health care delivery

Jive Software, Inc. today announced that Cerner Corp., a global leader in health care technology, has expanded its use of Jive's enterprise communication and collaboration solutions. Cerner's 93,000-member community, called "uCern," uses Jive-n to enable industry-wide collaboration that helps clinicians systemically strive to improve health care delivery.

Read full article on news-medical.net


AACE diabetes guidelines address cancer risk, vaccines, and high-risk occupations

New diabetes mellitus practice guidelines from the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists introduce recommendations on evaluating cancer ri... More »

Read full article on Diabetes, Endocrinology, Metabolism


Teens who tan indoors do it often

More than one-third of teens who undergo indoor tanning do so frequently, according to data from a survey of 1,850 public high school students from 27... More »

Read full article on Dermatology


AACR: Metformin survival benefit shaky in pancreatic cancer

A detailed survival analysis questions the rationale behind use of the diabetes drug metformin to improve pancreatic cancer survival. Several epidemi... More »

Read full article on Oncology


New UM SOM study uncovers never-before-seen illness transmitted by ticks

Tick-borne diseases are a major public health problem around the world. Ticks carry and transmit a variety of microbes that cause disease. These illnesses, which include Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, and Tularemia, can cause a variety of symptoms, often serious and sometimes deadly.

Read full article on news-medical.net


FDA Weighs Tighter Regulation of Homeopathic Medicines

Title: FDA Weighs Tighter Regulation of Homeopathic Medicines
Category: Health News
Created: 4/21/2015 12:00:00 AM
Last Editorial Review: 4/22/2015 12:00:00 AM

Read full article on medicinenet.com


Researchers Test Powdered Insulin to Prevent Diabetes

Title: Researchers Test Powdered Insulin to Prevent Diabetes
Category: Health News
Created: 4/22/2015 12:00:00 AM
Last Editorial Review: 4/22/2015 12:00:00 AM

Read full article on medicinenet.com


3.8 Million Chickens To Be Killed After Bird Flu Outbreak at Iowa Farm

Title: 3.8 Million Chickens To Be Killed After Bird Flu Outbreak at Iowa Farm
Category: Health News
Created: 4/21/2015 12:00:00 AM
Last Editorial Review: 4/22/2015 12:00:00 AM

Read full article on medicinenet.com


Most Adults Don't Support Medical Marijuana for Kids, Poll Finds

Title: Most Adults Don't Support Medical Marijuana for Kids, Poll Finds
Category: Health News
Created: 4/22/2015 12:00:00 AM
Last Editorial Review: 4/22/2015 12:00:00 AM

Read full article on medicinenet.com


Many Young Adults With Autism Face Unemployment, Isolation

Title: Many Young Adults With Autism Face Unemployment, Isolation
Category: Health News
Created: 4/21/2015 12:00:00 AM
Last Editorial Review: 4/22/2015 12:00:00 AM

Read full article on medicinenet.com


Ban Flavoring, Ads for E-Cigarettes, Doctors' Group Says

Title: Ban Flavoring, Ads for E-Cigarettes, Doctors' Group Says
Category: Health News
Created: 4/22/2015 12:00:00 AM
Last Editorial Review: 4/22/2015 12:00:00 AM

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Could High-Dose Insulin Prevent Type 1 Diabetes in High-Risk Kids?

Title: Could High-Dose Insulin Prevent Type 1 Diabetes in High-Risk Kids?
Category: Health News
Created: 4/21/2015 12:00:00 AM
Last Editorial Review: 4/22/2015 12:00:00 AM

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Health Tip: Manage Weight-Loss Goals

Title: Health Tip: Manage Weight-Loss Goals
Category: Health News
Created: 4/22/2015 12:00:00 AM
Last Editorial Review: 4/22/2015 12:00:00 AM

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More Kids With Type 1 Diabetes Facing Dangerous Complication

Title: More Kids With Type 1 Diabetes Facing Dangerous Complication
Category: Health News
Created: 4/21/2015 12:00:00 AM
Last Editorial Review: 4/22/2015 12:00:00 AM

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Health Tip: Dealing With Bedtime Anxiety

Title: Health Tip: Dealing With Bedtime Anxiety
Category: Health News
Created: 4/22/2015 12:00:00 AM
Last Editorial Review: 4/22/2015 12:00:00 AM

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Diabetes Drug May Not Guard Against Pancreatic Cancer

Title: Diabetes Drug May Not Guard Against Pancreatic Cancer
Category: Health News
Created: 4/21/2015 12:00:00 AM
Last Editorial Review: 4/22/2015 12:00:00 AM

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Statins Carry Some Risk for Seniors, Study Suggests

Title: Statins Carry Some Risk for Seniors, Study Suggests
Category: Health News
Created: 4/22/2015 12:00:00 AM
Last Editorial Review: 4/22/2015 12:00:00 AM

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Freedom to Fidget Helps Kids With ADHD Learn: Study

Title: Freedom to Fidget Helps Kids With ADHD Learn: Study
Category: Health News
Created: 4/21/2015 12:00:00 AM
Last Editorial Review: 4/22/2015 12:00:00 AM

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Mindfulness-Based Therapy as Good as Meds for Depression, Study Says

Title: Mindfulness-Based Therapy as Good as Meds for Depression, Study Says
Category: Health News
Created: 4/21/2015 12:00:00 AM
Last Editorial Review: 4/22/2015 12:00:00 AM

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Another Study Finds No Vaccine-Autism Link

Title: Another Study Finds No Vaccine-Autism Link
Category: Health News
Created: 4/21/2015 12:00:00 AM
Last Editorial Review: 4/22/2015 12:00:00 AM

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Ice Cream Maker Pulls All Products After Listeria Outbreak

Title: Ice Cream Maker Pulls All Products After Listeria Outbreak
Category: Health News
Created: 4/21/2015 12:00:00 AM
Last Editorial Review: 4/22/2015 12:00:00 AM

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Study Supports HPV Vaccination Guidelines

Title: Study Supports HPV Vaccination Guidelines
Category: Health News
Created: 4/21/2015 12:00:00 AM
Last Editorial Review: 4/22/2015 12:00:00 AM

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Training Programs for Parents Tied to Better Behavior in Kids With Autism

Title: Training Programs for Parents Tied to Better Behavior in Kids With Autism
Category: Health News
Created: 4/21/2015 12:00:00 AM
Last Editorial Review: 4/22/2015 12:00:00 AM

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AAAAI: Grass allergy tablets show favorable NNT

HOUSTON – The number needed to treat with Timothy grass sublingual immunotherapy tablets for allergic rhinitis to achieve a clinically meaningful re... More »

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VIDEO: Treating heart failure congestion improved hyperglycemia

SAN DIEGO – Congestion secondary to advanced heart failure appears to cause type 2 diabetes in a significant subgroup of patients, based on suggesti... More »

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Depression combined with diabetes more than doubles dementia risk

Depression and type 2 diabetes mellitus can separately increase the risk for dementia, but that risk is even greater when both conditions are present.... More »

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Alogliptin CV risk acceptable, FDA panel agrees

SILVER SPRING, MD.– Alogliptin’s cardiovascular risk profile is acceptably safe for high-risk patients with type 2 diabetes, a Food and Drug Admin... More »

Read full article on Diabetes, Endocrinology, Metabolism


Autonomic imbalance predicts some measures of metabolic syndrome

High resting heart rate and low heart rate variability – both indicators of autonomic imbalance – can predict some elements of metabolic syndrome,... More »

Read full article on Diabetes, Endocrinology, Metabolism


Gastric emptying more rapid in adolescents with type 1 diabetes

Adolescents with type 1 diabetes experienced more rapid gastric emptying time than did healthy controls, which was linked to greater postprandial rise... More »

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Stenting before CABG linked to higher mortality for diabetic patients

Since the debut of drug-eluting stents, more high-risk patient groups, namely diabetic patients, have undergone coronary stenting as opposed to corona... More »

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How to forestall heart failure by 15 years

SAN DIEGO– Men and women who are able to prevent or delay onset of hypertension, obesity, and diabetes beyond age 45 years can expect to reap a majo... More »

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Metabolic syndrome more prevalent in bipolar disorder

Metabolic syndrome was significantly more prevalent in patients with bipolar disorder than in those with major depressive disorder or in controls, Bar... More »

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Unrecognized diabetes common in acute MI

Ten percent of patients who presented with acute MI to 24 U.S. hospitals during a 3-year study had unrecognized diabetes, and only one-third of these ... More »

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Avoid voriconazole in transplant patients at risk for skin cancer

SAN FRANCISCO – Voriconazole increased the risk of squamous cell carcinoma by 73% in a review of 455 lung transplant patients at the University of C... More »

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KOH solution, AK treatment both improve genital warts

MIAMI BEACH – Two novel therapies have potential for the treatment of genital warts, according to Dr. Theodore Rosen. The first of these “way-off... More »

Read full article on Dermatology


Ixekizumab met psoriasis endpoints by week 12, with durable response at 60 weeks

SAN FRANCISCO – More than 80% of psoriasis patients who received ixekizumab achieved a 75% reduction in the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score ... More »

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Apremilast meets psoriasis endpoints at week 32

SAN FRANCISCO – Apremilast met its primary endpoint at week 32 with no new or serious safety signals among patients with moderate to severe plaque p... More »

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Teenage tattoos are most often regretted

SAN FRANCISCO – The younger people are when they get a tattoo, the more likely they are to regret it later, according to a survey of 501 people in t... More »

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Combine topicals, orals for onychomycosis

MIAMI BEACH – Two new topical solutions approved in 2014 for the treatment of distal subungual onychomycosis don’t eliminate the need for oral tre... More »

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Apremilast heals oral ulcers in Behçet’s syndrome

Apremilast reduced the number and pain of oral ulcers in patients with Behçet’s syndrome in an industry-sponsored phase II trial, according to a re... More »

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Acne gel works better in women

A gel combination of clindamycin phosphate 1.2% and benzoyl peroxide 3.75% was significantly more effective against acne vulgaris than a vehicle gel, ... More »

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New psoriatic arthritis screening tool passes initial validation

The second version of the Toronto Psoriatic Arthritis screen performed well at identifying psoriatic arthritis in 336 psoriasis patients, 131 psoriati... More »

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Worse melanoma outcomes found in pregnant women

SAN FRANCISCO – Pregnancy increases the risk of poor outcomes in melanoma, according to a review of melanoma cases at the Cleveland Clinic. The ef... More »

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Chemotherapy and stem-cell transplantation combination appears safe

In a population of patients with hematologic malignancies who refuse blood product transfusions, high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) followed by autologous s... More »

Read full article on Oncology


SSIs a factor in postop colon cancer survival

HOUSTON – Surgical-site infections occurring in patients who underwent curative resection for localized colon cancer were associated with worse over... More »

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HPV-targeted TILs trigger CR in some advanced cervical cancer patients

Treatment of nine women with metastatic cervical cancer with single infusions of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes grown out from tumor specimens collect... More »

Read full article on Oncology


Pembrolizumab bests ipilimumab in advanced melanoma

Pembrolizumab was superior to ipilimumab, the standard of care, as first-line therapy for advanced melanoma in the phase III KEYSTONE-006 trial. Pemb... More »

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Class of 2015: New drugs projected to earn billions and billions

Of all drugs to be released in 2015, the melanoma drug Opdivo (nivolumab) is expected to have the brightest future, according to a report from Thomson... More »

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Alzheimer’s drug improves cognitive function after RT for brain tumors

Adult brain tumor survivors taking donepezil, a drug approved for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, showed significant improvements in the cogni... More »

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Task Force: Start biennial mammograms at age 50

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force is continuing to recommend routine mammograms every 2 years for women starting at age 50, according to newly r... More »

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VIDEO: Circulating tumor DNA testing shows real-world limits

GENEVA – Circulating tumor DNA currently has one role to play in routine management of lung cancer patients: To check at the time of diagnosis for a... More »

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PD-L1 blockade breaks through triple-negative breast cancer

Metastatic triple-negative breast cancer appears to be the latest hard-to-treat cancer to yield to the juggernaut that is now anti-PD-L1 immunotherapy... More »

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New educational resource to help improve knowledge, treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

A new educational resource for doctors and healthcare professionals will help improve knowledge and treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). The Inflammatory Bowel Disease Resource Centre was developed by Elsevier, the journal Digestive and Liver Disease, and was made possible through an educational grant from Ferring Pharmaceuticals.

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Catasys to offer OnTrak Program to Health Alliance members in Illinois

Catasys, Inc. and Health Alliance Medical Plans today announced a multi-year agreement to offer Catasys' OnTrak Program to Health Alliance members in need in Illinois. OnTrak provides support and guidance to commercial, Medicaid and Medicare Advantage members struggling with both medical and behavioral conditions.

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Universal prevention programs can help prevent mental health problems in higher education students

Is it possible to prevent mental health problems in higher education students? The answer is "yes" according to a team of psychologists from Loyola University Chicago who conducted a careful, systematic review of 103 universal interventions involving over 10,000 students enrolled in 2- and 4-year colleges and universities and graduate programs.

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